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20120930
20121008
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Book TV 33
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CSPAN2 33
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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 1:00pm EDT
different choices in education. you see one young man majoring in math and science. one young women majoring in, actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. when they enter the workplace, you see more women going into nonprofits and working shorter hours and you see more men in investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. now, a man and then the woman who start off at goldman sachs, they start out the same, they should be paid the same, but if they are not, there are avenues to dispute. that is the difference. >> host: what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> guest: i think they need to have a council on men and boys. you can see the young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, the single men have lower earnings. you can see that their are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than girls. if th
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 1:00am EDT
. that's folds. false. they make different choices in education. you see young minute majoring in matt and science. and more young women in gender study and literature. field that are not going pay as well. when they enter the workplace you see more women going in to non-profit and shorter hours and more men in and investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason the two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man and woman in the investment bank, they got out of cold man sacks. those should be paid the same. they are paid the same. if there are not there avenues to sue. that's the big difference. >> what dow you think about the white house counsel on women and girls? >> i think the white house needs to have a counsel on men and boys. because you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and women than the single men have lower earnings. you see they are far higher rates of boys cropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than girls. and so if the white house wants to have
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 10:00pm EDT
an education, despite no other virtue then we were born here. nobody deserves to be an american. nobody held a contest and said you were okay, you deserve it, you get to be an american. by the grace of god, we are americans. but this little guy was born into one of the worst environments possible, into a country where you will probably starve to death and get cholera and a bunch of other diseases, probably. if not, you might get maimed. so you might have this. okay, i went to bed hungry a few times because i was born to a teenage mother. okay, my life was pretty bad. let me tell you something. nobody cared -- nobody here has had a really bad. this guy has it bad. now he is laying their dying because his right foot is blowing off, his other foot is partially blown off. he had gangrene and he is dying a slow and miserable death. of course, being an american, what we want to do? we want to help the kid. but do i really want to help the kid -- i'm running a safe house. i am in the middle of baghdad territory, i am risking the lives of my agents if i help this young man because that is not my job
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 3:00pm EDT
content vehicles go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> next on booktv education activists jonathan kozol talks about inner-city children he followed since the age of 6 to 18-year-old. he examines the economic and educational obstacles each child has face as they progress through their school system. it is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. thanks, tom and thanks as always to my absolutely favorite bookstore in america, politics and prose. i love that books for. [applause] and thanks to each and every one of you for being here. i am particularly glad to the with so many friends tonight. i don't mean with some double meaning, i just mean friends old and new. some of my oldest friends in the audience. it means a great deal to me because to -- tomorrow is my birthday. i will be all alone on an airplane going through six hours to some place i haven't checked the schedule yet, i think it is something like portland, ore. or san diego. united airlines is not going to give me any presents. are there any teachers with us tonight? how many? oh, great. i am glad. [applause] >> i always feel
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 1:15am EDT
education system to free up the knowledge to make it look attractive for minorities to have the desire to want to learn the way out to be just as successful as those that they look up to? >> writing the book one of the things that has stuck with me is yon black and brown men, young boys are not accepting. culturally part of it is societal but the dinosaur had the ice age. we have education and technology. they did not make the adjustment it is not here. if the black brown mail this not make the adjustment they will not be here. we have to make it safe for our children to be smart, respectful, individua ls because what i was a boy i wanted to be excepted so bad i or myself to me i try. i will never let that happen again. to say if i cannot change the people around me you have to be afraid to stand by yourself that is the clearest it will ever be. there is a tendency to be accepted so bad people have all kinds of estimations but a man would do anything to take care of the family. not that i would not do that. and a woman sought a man who do anything you could do it every wanted the you w
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 10:00am EDT
this story with the world. you wouldn't know it to look over here, but public education is our most pressing political, social and moral problem. everybody knows it, and positions are entrenched, and there's a lot of hot rhetoric on all sides. somehow we've gotten to a point where frustration has built to such a fever pitch, that we've turned on teachers as the villains and started shutting down schools all over the country. as a writer after a good story to tell, i went looking in the pressure cooker of a public high school working against the clock to raise test scores. i wanted to take a look at what we're throwing away in this big national purge. instead, i found a dynamic principle leading a -- principal, leading a group of passionate, dedicated teachers at a school with a proud tradition to rally the community around. i found a scramble to help a surprisingly savvy group of kids who have been largely abandoned by the system. um, as most of you probably know, the book traces the pivotal 2009-2010 school year at reagan high, and we've been -- weaved in a lot of its history. not all, but
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 7:00pm EDT
and reading for national review and overcome the education at harvard university and the upbringing in west virginia, he it a touring figure of the conservative movement. rightly sew. a professor of government the the clare month college. he's the coed or it with william f. buckley of keeping the tablet of modern american conservative thought. he is written extensively on american constitutionalism and political ideas. indeed the addition nat federalist paper the one published -- is the best selling edition in the united states. he can contributes regularly to the opinion pages of the "the wall street journal," "los angeles times," writes about flicks, and -- politicking and national review among other journals. he's a senior fellow at the claire monththe mission to e ree the principles of the american found ming is the intellectual muscle of the i guess -- mission pings. he teaches in the key fellow programs. the fellows program and the lincoln fellows program. most important he's the editor of the clermont review books. a public cage of the clermont substitute. i encourage you to sib croi
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 12:15am EDT
the michigan education association used their political clout to kill the bill. if costs were going to be cut by one of those cuts to go elsewhere. they wanted taxes to go up. that is what it's been happening in wisconsin. in wisconsin school districts districts and municipality simply didn't have the power to roll back some of those union benefits so they only solution to keep a service is going was higher taxes. unions were fine with that it wasn't until scott walker reforms which they protested vehemently and the school districts and municipality's gave the ability to get control of their budgets to bring cost and that is when we saw property taxes fall. government exists to serve the people. protecting the public in giving children get education not be good for cutting into it to families take him pay. the common good has to take tired or over the interest of any narrow group. government unions make this impossible. think about what collective pardoning powers do. means the governments, the people rather their elected representatives have to sit down with government unions and bargain wit
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 12:00pm EDT
's story. that is who she was writing for. she was writing to educate young people. educate them on the politics and social situations of the time. before the publication of "uncle tom's cabin", they were living off of calvin's salary, which was not very much. it was really after the publication of "uncle tom's cabin" and she became a famous author. the most famous author in america, if not the world. this novel brought her great fame and with it came -- some prosperity, but it would've been more if she would've negotiated a contract. she continued to write and she wrote prolifically after the publication of "uncle tom's cabin." before that, she had mostly written sketches for magazines and things like that. but this was her first big novel. after that she wrote income generating novels. she was a housewife who didn't have much of an income. but after "uncle tom's cabin" she became prosperous. she wrote a testament after the publication of "uncle tom's cabin." this is where she lived after what the novel that for her personally. the houses in the process of renovation and being a
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 5:00pm EDT
private prisons, education to more recently military and security issues has been put outward with much rhetoric, but not a lot of evidence in terms of cost effect it has, for example. my question is simply, how much reflects a blind faith in the precepts of the marketplace and adam smith and how much is attached to corporations that will benefit them in the future? i've written a book on the subject with respect to military contractors with little purple evidence. >> i see the correlation is inverted. it is more expensive and you get less out of it. we have seen how well halliburton dead when they took over the logistics of the army. the army cannot feed itself anymore, which is kind of ridiculous. look at other scandals in iraq can you see these across the board. national security badges is what i did and at some point it struck me as overwhelming that these things were not working as the vonage had claimed they would work. and there are some things that not only because of cost effect of mass i don't want some contract to looking at sensitive surveillance intelligence. i don't want s
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 4:00pm EDT
literary education colonial. in those early years he was certainly not a student of the boys lengths, houston or the harlem renaissance of the riding that would subsequently shape and professionally. perhaps it is his blindly cosmopolitan perspective on the united states and on its literature that gives him such a clear eye view of it. that may be too easy a formulation. in any case, suffice it to say that his work really is without compare. the word magisterial is often used in conjunction with biographies, so the effect of the word has diminished somewhat i want to restore. as i think -- as i can think of no better word than that to describe the march and authority of his four masterworks, the art and imagination of w. e. b. du bois, life of langston hughes, in two volumes, jackie robinson, a biography, and rob allison, a biography. the first volume of the hughes biography was the pulitzer prize. the ellison was a finalist for the national book award. in recognition of his contributions not only to african-american biography but also to the genre of biography itself he recently rec
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 5:00pm EDT
close to his family, but he was lifted out of his family and sent to get an education of a sort that no one else in his family got. he had a brother that became a doctor. he didn't have anybody else that went as far as he did in terms of his education. and then going out in to the world in a way that he did, he was lifted up to become the very important figure and he traveled around the world, he took two extended trips to europe and the middle east. and these were very influential for him. he saw the importance or he und the importance of the american republican system in a they he might not had he not traveled and so on. but there are many questions particularly, i think, about his transition to becoming such an adamant emancipationist that i think are still mysterious. i think we can explain some of the support for the union based on having his travel mored and having gone outside the union and having the education that other members didn't have and having had the experience he had. where that antislavely kernel started. that can be traced back to his teens, actually, i cite
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 7:00pm EDT
all kinds of positive rights of the right to housing and education and a right to health and its job and all this. our constitution of course doesn't. our constitution is of - rights, the government shall not in the bill of rights the government shall not. it's against the power of the government. south africa constantly rights they have no limit the supreme court has no limitation on jurisdiction. somebody can come into court and say the constitution promises me a job and i don't have a job. what are you judge is going to do about that? on the one hand it's very wonderful not to have these barriers and on the other hand it's quite a problem for the court because the court cannot actually effect giving that plaintiff of job, and so it's left in a situation where there's lots of promise that had been given the court can't fulfill so there is a gap that has grown of expectations and field promises. maybe john marshall in the early justice salt around the corner. i don't know but they decided early on that they were going to be barriers to entry. the one last historical call point i wou
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 11:00am EDT
, fish hatcheries. i could go on all day. it is transforming america's approach to energy, education, health care, transportation and more. it is one of the most important and least understood pieces of legislation in modern american history. the short term recovery part as well as the long term investment part. it is also the purist distillation of what obama meant by change. it is a major down payment on all of his biggest campaign promises. the story of the stimulus not only fun and gripping story but it is a microcosm of the obama era. the best way to understand the president, his policies, his approach to politics, his achievements and his troubled marketing this achievement in a city that has gone bonkers. also the best way to understand his enemies. this book documents the republican plot to destroy obama before he even took office. you always heard about it and imagine it must be there but i got these guys to tell me about it. these secret meetings where eric cantor and mitch mcconnell plan their paths to power. before i open this up to what you want to talk about i want to t
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 4:15pm EDT
, education, activism. paul jennings had a granddaughter, his namesake named pauline. she was the daughter of a slave. she married the son of a slave and yet he got an m.d. from howard university with a practicing physician in georgetown where they own a home which is a pretty remarkable opportunity given only one generation out of slavery. a very remarkable achievement. their son was an m.d. as well and he is one of my favorite jennings descendants. i like to think that he inherited his ancestor's genes for race activism. as an african-american doctor, he could not go to just any medical school. the about practice in just any hospital. black doctors were not even allowed to join the a am a. he was very active in agitating against these restrictions but he didn't limit his activism to greater opportunities for members of his profession. he spearheaded a petition drive to keep a recreational area in georgetown from becoming segregated and he published bold editorials on race in the washington post and other newspapers. that is the living legacy. i am also fascinated by the legacy of place i
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 12:30am EDT
for. she was writing to kind of educate young people on the politics and the social situation of her time. this is middle-class i guess but before the publication of uncle tom's cabin they were living off of calvin salary which really wasn't very much. after the publication of uncle tom's cabin she became a sensation, the most famous author of america and in the world. she did a tour of great britain part no i mean this novel brought her great things and with the came considerable prosperity though there would have been more if she had negotiated a better contract with her publishers etc., etc. but she continued to write and she wrote prolifically after the publication of uncle tom's cabin. after that she had written sketches for the magazine but this was her first big novel. after that she wrote several and all of them were income generating novels. she was a housewife and didn't have much of an income but she became prosperous and her house, her real house, she might say the house that she built in hartford connecticut is basically a testament to her prosperity that came after the
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 6:00pm EDT
of education. the brown case had been argued before the court prior to warren's arrival and held over the previous term. it is impossible to know, i think, any fair estimation has to admit that it's impossible to know precisely how the court would have ruled under warren's predecessor. but notes from the conference under chief justice fred vincent, his predecessor, suggest that at best the court would have struck school segregation by a vote of 6-3 with vincent dissenting. at worst, it is possible that it might have gone 5-4 to uphold segregation. the latter would have been a catastrophe for race relations, but even a split vote striking school segregation could have been calamitous. it would have 'em boldened segregationists to find support for their institutions in the supreme court, particularly by its chief justice. the job confronting warren in his first term then was nothing less than a defining test of american race relations. as warren took over brown, i think it mattered that he came from neither north, nor south, but he was a westerner, and as such, somewhat less invested in
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 8:00pm EDT
and women make different choices in the workplace. they make different choices starting in education. you see more young men and majoring in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature. fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace, you see more women going into nonprofit. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more than an investment banks in computer science. there isn't any reason that these two group should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man at a woman in an investment bank though that goldman sachs should be paid the same. they are paid the same and if they are not there are avenues to sue. but that is the big difference. >> what do you think about the white house counsel on women and girls? >> well i think the white house leak has a counsel on men and boys because you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far h
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 8:00pm EDT
working at that time. blight said in an interview with the chronicle of higher education that all four and a quote argued fiercely with america's tendency toward a progressive triumphal sunny sense of history and all four his quote continues demanded americans try to see through their well practiced and comfortable myths about the civil war and develop a genuine and authentically tragic sense of history. blight's mackiel critic carol phillips said of the book and i quote it effortlessly seems together literary analysis biography and historical thinking and in a thoughtful and appreciative review in the new york review of looks andrew del benko causes suggested. one of our most noted and lauded historians, david blight is the class of 1954 professor of american history and director of the guilford lehrman. is held fellowships of the hunting library in the colman center for writers and scholars and is an elected member of the american academy of arts and sciences. light is committed to doing the work of the public historian as well answer some numerous boards of museums and historical so
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 5:45am EDT
now have formed a large -- there are a enough of them. they are educating us about the truth of life in north korea. and there have, several books published about life in north korea, and we now have a much better picture what the truth of the existence is there. but the north korea refugees are performing a second equally important function. arguably even more important. they are helping to open up their own information starved homeland. just as the world now knows about north korea. north koreans know far more about the world. this too is thanks to the earths of yort koreas who have escaped. how do they do that? think a minute. any immigrant who goes to a new country, what's the first thing they want to do? he wants to let his family back home know he's okay. and them about his new life. but for north koreas who wants to the do that it's next to impossible up. you can't make a phone call to north korea. you can't an e-mail or text message or facebook. you can't even mail a letter. so the exiles have created a black market in information. they hire chinese couriers to cross the bord
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 1:30pm EDT
written sources. there are a few in the archives but they're mostly the french educated lower rank officers and they have a particular perspective. the most detailed documents were the accounts of white french officers and these accounts they wrote shortly after the campaign a couple of months or year or two after the campaign and they rode them with a very different purpose. they rode them to highlight certain soldiers who should get military medals and they also read them because the french government and the army wanted to understand what had gone wrong in 1940, why did we use this campaign so disastrously so it wasn't about human rights or not document in the massacres, but in the context of trying to explain the defeat, the officers very often gave a lot of detail on what had actually happened in the combat right after these people were taken prisoner so those are the most important sources. the soldiers in the diaries admit that they did kill africans. very few of them, but what you can see in the german source mostly the stereotypes about men eating african soldiers that mir
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 9:45am EDT
establish for two reasons. one is because there is a need for education in tennessee and the answer is that there is a memorial in the fat. so howard is says to sentiments together and forming this university and served as president in 1890s. this is an oddball peas because it's signed by jefferson davis, the higher theoretically if that actually would be shooting against a few years time. jefferson davis was of course secretary of war for the civil war and this is commissioned a second lieutenant. after he graduated from bowdoin, went to west point and was a commissioner commissioned officer after three years of being there. jefferson davis was an honorary recipient after the civil war. howard was appointed commissioner of the freedman's bureau. here is a letter from mary showed kerry, who was a black woven who is writing to howard, while howard is at this time president of howard university. he held both positions in the late 60s, early 70s. he had been a founding author of howard university. he and a group of others that a congregation of said about the civil war determining how
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 7:45pm EDT
things, if you go into the educational context and you are talking about mobile on a smart phone and a lot of this access to the broadband through mobile devices in minority communities in particular, i don't view that as an acceptable substitute for a desktop. >> i thought i would talk about why this story intrigues me so much, little bit about the reporting process. i think that is what intrigues me. i will in the first of all, i am sadly not be fully cross graduate. we were just having a lunch and it was the same day that there was a front-page story in "the new york times." going way back, he started to talk about classmates, the other black classmates and father brooks, and i was intrigued. i was intrigued because parents thomas was one of those classmates and i have not read much about the interaction between justice thomas and father brooks. so that just got me intrigued as a business journalist. it was not a classic business story. but i'm always interested in leadership and mentoring. took quite a while to get justice thomas to speak with me, in part because he didn't ne
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 9:00am EDT
" is also a great children's story that is who she was writing for. she was ready to kind of educate young people on the politics and social situation of her time. she's kind of middle-class i guess. before the publication of "uncle tom's cabin," they were living off calvin salary, which wasn't very much. after the publication of "uncle tom's cabin" she became a sensation, the most famous soccer in america, if not the world because this novel brought her great things and with it came considerable prosperity, but would've been more if she had negotiated a better contract with her publisher, et cetera, et cetera. but she continued to write and she broke prolifically after the publication of "uncle tom's cabin." before that novel she had mostly just written sketches for this magazine from a site that. but this was her first big novel. after that she wrote several unobvious or income generating novels. so she was a woman and a housewife who did not much of an m. but after "uncle tom's cabin" she became prosperous warehouse, to how she didn't rents come up with a house that she built over in ha
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 7:00pm EDT
for an appointment. it happened to be a nonpaying appointment to a board of education to a campaign contributor. he received nothing personally and demand in return got a state position that he held before under republicans. before that, don siegelman was prosecuted for bribery and was convicted in a research seven-month. he was out on appeal in that he's going back for nearly seven years. this is something george w. bush did with more than 100 appointees is a commonplace. the prettiest part of our system, but as a commonplace to become an ambassador. bush did it with over 100 of his appointees. of course he was not prosecuted, but he was in a maximum-security prison. he was at the democratic national convention and now two days ago he's gone off to jail. the other thing that is part of the u.s. attorney scandal, we see again in this election. the u.s. attorney by the name of david ecclesia said new mexico lasses job. in 2004, he was passed by rove with prosecuting what rove cause voter fraud. and to find people fraudulently registered to vote. he investigated for several instead it's not happening
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 1:15pm EDT
, this is to help education. so it's not enough to say that free markets work. people feel that they are somehow immoral, it is a somehow semi- corrupt bargain, it will wither away and die. we are trying to say no, free markets don't deliver goods, they deliver goods precisely because it is based on morality and moral optimism of the future. you don't make an investment if you think there's not a future. you don't take a risk the risk if you have an environment of pessimism. you take a risk and you think, i may lose everything, but it just may work, so i will try it. that is facing the future. that is why give that kind of optimism and free markets. >> host: in your book "freedom manifesto: why free markets are moral and big government isn't", there is a list of taxes, accounts receivable tax, cigarette tax, corporate income tax from a dog license tax, fishing license tax, irs penalties tax, luxury taxes, marriage license taxes, real estate taxes, i am editing as i go. etc. and etc. why did you include this list of different taxes in your book "freedom manifesto: why free markets are moral and b
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 2:00pm EDT
foreclosures. those children the scars, if you like him in the educational personal development for years to come. every time i hear some conservative politician explained why we haven't got the resources to do something about unemployment. another one of these economic downturns of capitalism. i scratch my head because even the most conservative calculation would indicate the cost of not doing something are larger and not to have been undertaken long ago, just as in this case, not to pursue far pushy foreignness, but just as in this case the most stunning thing if you are a normal thinking person, would be to ask yourself, let's see, the last time we had a crisis like this, the last time capitalism's instability took this terrible turn in the 1930s, something very different happened and is happening now. major steps were taken by democratic presidents come and middle of the road are, but suddenly everything changed and he wasn't a big middle of the voter. he suddenly became something else and did a lot of things for the mass of people. none of those are being done now. that is a remarkab
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 7:00am EDT
versus board of education, and he ordered the integration of the central high school in little rock and the demonstrations there which blocked the desegregation eisenhower ordered the 101st airborne division from fort campbell to little rock to enforce desegregation with a forceful message to everyone in the south that the desegregation integration was the loss of land and eisenhower was going to support it with the armed forces of the united states. what a powerful message. [applause] but finally, eisenhower did not take the lead in rgb advantages of integration as john f. kennedy and lyndon johnson to. eisenhower felt this was a difficult till -- pill to swallow and the best way to get them to do that was to stress that this was the law. this was the rule of law and he is president was going to take care of the law. it made it much easier, and easier pill for the south to swallow. [applause] >> jonathan is great to be with you today and with all the booklovers at this fabulous festival and with a very distinguished biographer, jean edward smith way think has contributed immeasurab
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 11:00pm EDT
education was considered more of a woman's issue in the legislature until in the 80's when we began connecting it to economic development. and once it became an economic development issue then it's no longer a woman's issue because she takes her children and now it's everybody's issue. >> one thing that younger people in the audience need to understand. for us, for our generation, women and also many many men, feminist was it positive for. it was a good thing, a very good thing and so you have got these women who embraced feminism who think it's a good thing and have now discovered that it's not working anymore. the women i teach don't want to identify with some of them. it's the last thing they want to be identified with and you asked them, do you believe in this and do you believe that in this and they say yes, yes, yes and i just go well the label is a problem. we have many women wanting -- not wanting to use the label and send signals that are so skewed with the label because they know there are group of voters out there who don't see it the way our generation saw it. >> we have
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 7:45am EDT
kind of issue. and every one of them has examples of that. if you stop and think of one time, education was considered more a women's issue with the state legislature until in the 80s we began connecting to economic development. a month they became an economic development issue, that is still ugly woman's issue because she takes care of the children. this is now everybody's issue. >> is one thing that younger people in the audience seemed to understand. for us, for our generation, women and also many, many men, it was a good thing, very good thing. so you've got these women who embrace feminism and it is a good thing in about discovered it's it's not working anymore. the women i teach don't want to be identified as feminists. it's the last thing they want to be identified with. you asked them, do you believe in this? to believe in this? and they say yes, yes you guessed it and then i go, here are feminist. the label is a positive. so you have many women not wanting to use the label, with not wanting to send signals associated because they know there is a group of voters out there who do
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 11:00am EDT
. a lot of people in the age group don't have the education or the desire to spend all their time watching cnn or reading any of the multiple newspapers that there are to get information about the election. so what they get their information from is the mudslinging commercials that are out now by super packs and even the politicians like obama last night who said this isn't a mudslinging campaign, even though we can't change the super subs are right now, how do we change from mudslinging to actual information about the politicians will do if they are elected versus just killing other people's campaigns. >> you know it's funny -- [applause] your reform is hard because one way we tried to stop that, the nastiness was by requiring candidates to appear themselves and say i am alex and i approve this message. so now they go on and approve the message that is mudslinging. so you know, that doesn't help. you know, first of all i'm sorry that young people don't want to read more sources and get our information, but a friend of mine named steve who taught at m.i.t. now teaches at harvard were to ta
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)